SOME SONGS ARE GREAT SHORT STORIES (Chapter 38)

Here we go again, it’s Monday at last
He’s heading for the Waterloo line
To catch the 8 a.m. fast, it’s usually dead on time
Hope it isn’t late, got to be there by nine

Pinstripe suit, clean shirt and tie
Stops off at the corner shop, to buy The Times
‘Good Morning Smithers-Jones’
‘How’s the wife and home?’
‘Did you get the car you’ve been looking for?’
‘Did you get the car you’ve been looking for?’

Let me get inside you, let me take control of you
We could have some good times
All this worry will get you down
I’ll give you a new meaning to life, I don’t think so

Sitting on the train, you’re nearly there
You’re a part of the production line
You’re the same as him, you’re like tin-sardines
Get out of the pack, before they peel you back

Arrive at the office, spot on time
The clock on the wall hasn’t yet struck nine
‘Good Morning Smithers-Jones’
‘The boss wants to see you alone’
‘I hope it’s the promotion you’ve been looking for’
‘I hope it’s the promotion you’ve been looking for’

‘Come in Smithers, old boy’
‘Take a seat, take the weight off your feet’
‘I’ve some news to tell you’
‘There’s no longer a position for you’
‘Sorry Smithers-Jones’

Put on the kettle and make some tea
It’s all a part of feeling groovy
Put on your slippers turn on the TV
It’s all a part of feeling groovy
It’s time to relax, now you’ve worked your arse off
But the only one smilin’ is the sun-tanned boss
Work and work you wanna work ’till you die
There’s plenty more fish in the sea to fry

mp3: The Jam – Smithers-Jones (single version)
mp3: The Jam – Smithers-Jones (album version)

Written by Bruce Foxton.  Originally released as the b-side to When You’re Young in August 1979.  Completely re-recorded for the album Setting Sons which was released three months later.

JC

 

6 thoughts on “SOME SONGS ARE GREAT SHORT STORIES (Chapter 38)

  1. Ace choice for this series. Even in an album that includes
    the wondrous Wasteland, Smithers-Jones stands tall.

  2. Such a great song. I wonder too if anyone else ever watchedtheTV comedy drama series ‘Grass’ from around 2003( I think), written by Andrew Collins and Simon Day (with Simon Day starring) – ever since seeing it I associate Smithers-Jones with a scene where it was used featuring a drug baron/gangster who ran a garden centre!

  3. Stand out track! Paints such a visual picture, back when you didn’t need someone else’s images in a video to explain/accompany a song.

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