INSPIRED BY YESTERDAY’S POSTING

I hope flimflamflan doesn’t mind, but I’m going to take the opportunity offered by his guest posting from yesterday to drae attention to the four other songs that appeared on the Texas Lullaby EP, an artefact that I have previously stated is one of THE greatest lost Scottish releases of the era. Ripped from the now very old vinyl!

mp3 : James King & The Lone Wolves – Texas Lullaby
mp3 : James King & The Lone Wolves – Sacred Heart
mp3 : James King & The Lone Wolves – Chance I Can’t Deny
mp3 : James King & The Lone Wolves – Until The Dawn

In case any of you are wondering, here’s an edited bio from the website of Stereogram, the record label to which they are presently attached:-

LINE UP:
JAMES KING: Vocals/Guitar
JAKE MASON: Guitar/Vocals
JOE SULLIVAN: Guitar
NICK CLARK: Bass.
COREY LITTLE: Drums

In the early 80’s, I was fascinated by how extreme bands were in the Post-Punk scenario. Particularly The Birthday Party, The Pop Group and Einsturzende Neubauten, even The Gun Club with their take on Voodoo Blues. I should have been looking closer to home! Some bunch of misfits in Glasgow were kicking up a hornet’s nest accompanied by the soundtrack of the darker sounds of the USA. Hank Williams, The Stooges and Johnny Thunders’ Heartbreakers, come to mind, but James King and the Lonewolves may have been using archetypical elements, yet they made them sound eloquent – there was classic songwriting here, although it may have been ‘cursed, poisoned and condemned’. James King had most definitely sold his soul to the devil at the same crossroads as Robert Johnson.

I remember writing a review in Cut magazine, stating I found them more sinister than The Violent Femmes, which was saying a lot, as they had just written Country Death Song – all about a father murdering, and disposing of his own daughter down a well. In the early 80’s, while Scottish pop was getting brighter and shinier, James King and the Lonewolves were the dark side, and they made no bones about it.

While ex-Fall guitarist, Martin Brammah’s band The Blue Orchids did the honours in Edinburgh, as fallen Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico’s backing band, The Lonewolves did the same in Glasgow.

They signed to Alan Horne’s Swamplands label in 1984 alongside Davy Henderson’s WIN! and Steven Daly’s Memphis, but after an Old Grey Whistle Test performance, featuring multiple profanities, which received countless complaints from viewers, Swamplands washed their hands of this unmanageable collection of individuals in 1985. An album recorded with John Cale at the height of his madness would never see the light of day. Until now that is – Sterogram Recordings are about to set the record straight, through the bands main protagonists burying the hatchet.

Fast forward to the future – James King and Jake McKechan make it up in 2011 after 25 years of not speaking and play a memorial show for former agent, Alan Mawn. It is nothing, if not fantastic. In light of all the complacency we are currently experiencing in modern music, hearing the sounds of James King and the Lonewolves again is a joy. This is Rock’n’Roll as it should be and you can tell they mean it maaan!

The first recorded fruits of the revamped Lonewolves in May 2013 was a revelation. Pretty Blue Eyes sounded like it should have been a double-sided 7” on Ork Records from 1975, as cool as Little Johnny Jewel by Television, you kinda wanted it to be longer. Fun Patrol kicked in like The Smiths’ How Soon is Now, then morphed into The Glitter band meets The Stooges – need I say more, and James still has a vicious tongue. James King and the Lonewolves – as stated on their very first single, were indeed Back from the Dead!

Now, having hooked up with Edinburgh’s Stereogram Recordings (home to The Cathode Ray and Roy Moller), that fantastic, long-lost album, Lost Songs of the Confederacy, has finally seen the light of day – obviously re-recorded, re-mastered and brought up to scratch with new recordings to supplement the buried ones resulting in James saying ‘ there was unfinished business to be done’. I’m sure there are many other buried treasures out there, meanwhile, this is as good a place as any to re-acquaint yourself with the Lonewolves’ particular brand of classic rock through the ages.

https://stereogramrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/lost-songs-of-the-confederacy-lp-cd-dl

JC

SOME SONGS ARE GREAT SHORT STORIES (Chapter 34)

A GUEST POSTING by flimflamfan

Following a rather down-beat post I provided to this very series (Antony and the Johnson’s – Paddy’s Gone) I became somewhat fixated by a much-loved song which is almost as down-beat as it is sparse with its evocative storytelling: James King and the LonewolvesLost.

Released in 1983 (Thrush 2), the final song on a 5 track 12” e.p., Lost leaves me anything but. It’s one of my all-time favourite Scottish songs; ranking extremely high within my favourite Glaswegian songs. It’s like a close friend. I’m very protective of it. It has brought joy when joy was needed.

Like Paddy’s Gone, Lost is delivered with such fragility there’s a sense that it could fall part at any moment. The hesitant vocals, the lyrics, the bass-y induced thud and that ending … a wall of guitar lost in its own melee. Genius.

The thing about this song and its story is … I’m not actually sure if the words below are the correct ones? This is how I’ve been signing it since, ahem, 1983. I’ve tried to find ‘actual’ lyrics but have had no luck.

You’re all I live for
You’re all I care for
I still have time for
Holding on

We’ve grown impatient
We’re tired of waiting
When are you coming?
I’m holding on

Searching for some feeling
Forever drifting
Our hopes are fading
I’m holding on

If I got any of the lyrics wrong then I’m a bit of a fool but … I won’t change them. I’ve lived with this song for so long that even if the words are incorrect, I care not.

Who did he/she live for? Who did he/she care for? And despite hope fading he/she held on – was his/her hope ever requited?

I’m quite in awe when a lyricist can say so much with so few words and this is a perfect example. With 4 other very strong contenders on one e.p. it may seem unkind, perhaps ungrateful, to choose a favourite but this short story seduces me every time.

mp3 : James King & The Lone Wolves – Lost

flimflamfan

 

SATURDAY’S SCOTTISH SONG : #151 & #152 : JAMES KING (AND THE LONEWOLVES)

I am in the debt of the fine people at Stereogram Recordings, an Edinburgh-based indie label, for the following words:-

In the early 80’s, I was fascinated by how extreme bands were in the Post-Punk scenario. Particularly The Birthday Party, The Pop Group and Einsturzende Neubauten, even The Gun Club with their take on Voodoo Blues. I should have been looking closer to home! Some bunch of misfits in Glasgow were kicking up a hornet’s nest accompanied by the soundtrack of the darker sounds of the USA. Hank Williams, The Stooges and Johnny Thunders’ Heartbreakers, come to mind, but James King and the Lonewolves may have been using archetypical elements, yet they made them sound eloquent – there was classic songwriting here, although it may have been ‘cursed, poisoned and condemned’. James King had most definitely sold his soul to the devil at the same crossroads as Robert Johnson.

I remember writing a review in Cut magazine, stating I found them more sinister than The Violent Femmes, which was saying a lot, as they had just written Country Death Song – all about a father murdering, and disposing of his own daughter down a well. In the early 80’s, while Scottish pop was getting brighter and shinier, James King and the Lonewolves were the dark side, and they made no bones about it.

While ex-Fall guitarist, Martin Brammah’s band The Blue Orchids did the honours in Edinburgh, as fallen Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico’s backing band, The Lonewolves did the same in Glasgow.

They signed to Alan Horne’s Swamplands label in 1984 alongside Davy Henderson’s WIN! and Steven Daly’s Memphis, but after an Old Grey Whistle Test performance, featuring multiple profanities, which received countless complaints from viewers, Swamplands washed their hands of this unmanageable collection of individuals in 1985. An album recorded with John Cale at the height of his madness would never see the light of day.

JC interupts……..

Here is said OGWT clip

There is a very audible profanity towards the end of what was a stellar performance which has presenter David Hepworth racing in to make an apology to any distressed viewers!

I’ve three singles in the collection in which James King features. The first is under his own name and dates from 1981; this is the lead track:-

mp3 : James King – Back From The Dead

There’s two under the moniker James King and The Lonewolves, one from 1983 on Thrush Records and one from 1985 on Swamplands. This is the lead from the latter:-

mp3 : James King & The Lonewolves – The Angels Know

Both still sound superb all these years later. Oh, and that album recorded with John Cale? Back to the fine folk at Stereogram:-

An album recorded with John Cale at the height of his madness would never see the light of day. Until now that is – Sterogram Recordings are about to set the record straight, through the bands main protagonists burying the hatchet.

Fast forward to the future – James King and Jake McKechan make it up in 2011 after 25 years of not speaking and play a memorial show for former agent, Alan Mawn. It is nothing, if not fantastic. In light of all the complacency we are currently experiencing in modern music, hearing the sounds of James King and the Lonewolves again is a joy. This is Rock’n’Roll as it should be and you can tell they mean it maaan!

Ken McCluskey (The Bluebells) in 1996 at height of Britpop, ‘You guys were 10 years too early’

The first recorded fruits of the revamped Lonewolves in May 2013 was a revelation. Pretty Blue Eyes sounded like it should have been a double-sided 7” on Ork Records from 1975, as cool as Little Johnny Jewel by Television, you kinda wanted it to be longer. Fun Patrol kicked in like The Smiths’ How Soon is Now, then morphed into The Glitter band meets The Stooges – need I say more, and James still has a vicious tongue. James King and the Lonewolves – as stated on their very first single, were indeed Back from the Dead!

Now, having hooked up with Edinburgh’s Stereogram Recordings (home to The Cathode Ray and Roy Moller), that fantastic, long-lost album, Lost Songs of the Confederacy, has finally seen the light of day – obviously re-recorded, re-mastered and brought up to scratch with new recordings to supplement the buried ones resulting in James saying ‘ there was unfinished business to be done’. I’m sure there are many other buried treasures out there, meanwhile, this is as good a place as any to re-acquaint yourself with the Lonewolves’ particular brand of classic rock through the ages.

ENDS

 

SATURDAY’S SCOTTISH SINGLE (Parts 61-65)

Back on 8 October 2011, I started a series called ‘Saturday’s Scottish Single’. The aim was to feature one 45 or CD single by a Scottish singer or band with the proviso that the 45 or CD single was in the collection. I had got to Part 60-something and as far as Kid Canaveral when the rug was pulled out from under TVV.

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(61) : James King – Back From The Dead b/w My Reward b/w As Tears Go By : Virgin 7″ (1981)

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(61a) : James King & The Lone Wolves – Texas Lullaby b/w Sacred Heart b/w Chance I Can’t Deny b/w Until The Dawn b/w Lost : Thrush Records 12″ EP (1983)

James King & The Lone Wolves embarked on a mid-80s mission to make the charts. Unfortunately, after only a couple of singles, ‘Texas Lullaby’ and ‘The Angels Know’, King split the group up in 1985. And yes, the last of the tracks on the Virgin single is that written by Jagger and Richards and made famous by Marianne Faithfull.

And as far as your humble scribe is concerned, Texas Lullaby is one of THE great lost Scottish releases of the era – everyone of the songs is well worth a listen.

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(62) James Yorkston & The Athletes – St Patrick b/w St Patrick (Vitus Mix) b/w Catching Eyes b/w Blue Madonnas : Domino Records CD single 2002

Read more about James Yorkston here

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(63) Jazzateers – Sixteen Reasons b/w Show Me The Door : Rough Trade 7″ (1983)

Read all about Jazzateers right here.

What that wiki entry doesn’t tell you is that the band reformed earlier this year for what proved to be a triumphant gig at Stereo in Glasgow on 27 June.  My review of that night was one of the the last of its type on TVV before google pulled the plug.

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(64) The Jesus & Mary Chain – Head On b/w In The Black  : Blanco y Negro 7″ (1989)

Read all about The Jesus & Mary Chain here.

As I said when I originally posted, this choice of single was influenced by the great haircuts on display on the sleeve. I’ve tried every one of those looks in days of old……

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(65) Johnny and The Self Abusers – Saints and Sinners b/w Dead Vandals : Chiswick Records (1977)

I cheated on this one.  I never owned the actual piece of vinyl but I do have the A-side on a compilation album.

It’s from the band that would later find fame and fortune under the name of  Simple Minds.  Oh and Saints and Sinners was a the name of a pub that would later find fame and more fame under the name of King Tut’s……

Parts 66-68 next week.